Colombian Arepuelas (Fried Arepas with Anise Seeds)

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AREPAS!

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I happen to be a lucky Puerto Rican girl who married a half Colombian and half Puerto Rican man! Talk about delicious food cultures, I could gain 10 lbs just walking into a Colombian restaurant (can anyone say Bandeja Paisa?) Anyhow, I’d never been exposed to Colombian cuisine until meeting the hubster, and in order to properly perform my wifely duties, I decided to learn how to make a cultural staple, arepas.  Arepas are as essential to Colombian meals as bread is to the Italian table.  It’s not a meal if there’s not an arepa somewhere on the plate.  This dish, arepuelas, or anisitas (rough translation: little anise ones) are a slightly sweet and uber delicious breakfast option native to the Atlantic Coast region of Colombia.  Serve these bad boys up with a good, strong cup of Juan Valdez’s addictive elixir, and some yummy farmer’s cheese (queso fresco).  It’s hard not to have a moment with these.

ingredients

(Makes 8 arepas)

1 cup masarepa (you can use either the white or yellow version)
1 cup warm water
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tsp toasted, crushed anise seeds
1/2 tsp of salt
Vegetable oil for frying

directions

Toss the anise seeds into a dry pan over low heat and toast until fragrant, stirring frequently (do not burn!)  Crush slightly with the back of a spoon.

Combine the masarepa, warm water, salt, toasted anise seeds and sugar, mixing thoroughly. Let mixture stand, covered, for five minutes to allow the cornmeal to fully hydrate.

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Form 8 small balls with the dough. Place each ball between 2 sheets of wax paper and with a dinner plate, cutting board, frying pan, or any other flat-bottomed object, and flatten to ¼ inch.

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Heat the vegetable oil in a large heavy pot to 350 F. Add the arepas in the heated oil one by one, fry for 3 minutes or until golden brown on both side, turning over once about half way through.  You’ll know it’s time to turn it when the edges get golden, just like a pancake.

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Using a slotted spoon, carefully remove the arepas from the oil and drain on paper towels.

Proceed to stuff your face, and prepare for a nap.

Buen provecho!

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Colombian Arepuelas (Fried Arepas with Anise Seeds)

Cuisine Colombian
Servings 8 servings
Author Delish D'Lites

Ingredients

  • 1 cup masarepa you can use either the white or yellow version
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tsp toasted crushed anise seeds
  • 1/2 tsp of salt
  • Vegetable oil for frying

Instructions

  1. Toss the anise seeds into a dry pan over low heat and toast until fragrant, stirring frequently (do not burn!) Crush slightly with the back of a spoon.
  2. Combine the masarepa, warm water, salt, toasted anise seeds and sugar, mixing thoroughly. Let mixture stand, covered, for five minutes to allow the cornmeal to fully hydrate.
  3. Form 8 small balls with the dough. Place each ball between 2 sheets of wax paper and with a dinner plate, cutting board, frying pan, or any other flat-bottomed object, and flatten to ¼ inch.
  4. Heat the vegetable oil in a large heavy pot to 350 F. Add the arepas in the heated oil one by one, fry for 3 minutes or until golden brown on both side, turning over once about half way through. You'll know it's time to turn it when the edges get golden, just like a pancake.
  5. Using a slotted spoon, carefully remove the arepas from the oil and drain on paper towels.
  6. Proceed to stuff your face, and prepare for a nap.

Colombian Arepuelas (Fried Arepas with Anise Seeds)

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Hola

I’m Jannese, Founder of Delish D’lites

I’m a Puerto Rican girl living in paradise (Florida), and the creative mind behind Delish D’Lites. I love sharing my family recipes and travel inspired cuisine! My favorite things include collecting passport stamps, twerking to Latin music, and kissing puppies. Follow along on social.